Why enterprise mobile computing needs an mBroker – part 1

mobilephonesMobile computing is all the rage, with employees, consumers and customers all wanting to use their mobile devices to transact business. But how should an enterprise approach mobile computing without getting into a world of trouble? How can the enterprise future-proof itself so that as mobile enterprise access explodes the risks are mitigated?

mBrokers are emerging as the preferred method of building a sustainable, governable and effective enterprise mobile computing architecture. The mBroker brings together ESB, integration broker, service gateway, API management and mobile access technology to provide the glue necessary to bring the mobile and corporate worlds together effectively and efficiently; for a summary of mBroker functionality see this free Lustratus report. In this first post in a series looking at mBrokers, we will look at the fundamental drivers for the basic broking functionality offered by mBrokers.

Integration brokers have been around for many years now. The principle is that when trying to integrate different applications or computing environments, some form of ‘universal translator’ is needed. One application may expect data in one format while another expects a different format for example. A trivial example might be an intenrational application where some components expect mm/dd/yy while others want dd/mm/yy. The broker handles these transformation needs. But it plays another very important role apart from translating between different applications; it provides a logical separation between application components, so that requestors can request services and suppliers can supply services without either knowing anything about each other’s location/environment/technology. In order to achieve this, it provides other functionality such as intelligent routing to find the right service and execution location, once again without the service requestor having to know anything about it.

Enterprise mobile applications face a lot of the same challenges. When crossing from the mobile device end to the corporate business services end, the same problems must be addressed. For example, mobile applications often rely on JSON for format notation and use RESTful invocation mechanisms to drive services. But many corporate networks employ an SOA model based around XML data and SOAP-based invocations of services.  In addition, the same sort of abstraction layer offered by integration brokers is beneficial to avoid the mobile device needing to know about locations of back end applications. It is therefore not surprising to find that integration broker technology is one source for mBroker technology.