Why do so many SOA adopters moan about low reuse levels?

I was reading a recent post from Joe McKendrick the other day on measuring SOA success…

…and it reminded me of a related issue – that of measuring services reuse. SOA adopters often moan to me that despite having implemented SOA and deployed many services, reuse rates are down at the 1-1.2 level – in other words, virtually no reuse. They seem to want to pick a fight with me because as an advocate of SOA I have often pointed to reuse as one of the more measurable benefits. After all, achieving a high level of reuse is a clear indicator to business executives that efficiency is increasing, since the implication is less development is required to do new things.

I am starting to get pretty short now inthese conversations. I wish, wish, wish that people would heed my previous advice – don’t think of SOA delivering reusable services, think of it as a great tool for SHARED services. Obviously reuse will come through services being shared – so what point am I trying to make? The problem is people are choosing to build ‘reusable services’ with SOA and assuming that others will start reusing them. It is the old ‘Build and they will come’ philosophy. This rarely works – it is worse than a scatter-gun approach. If users instead think about what services would be good candidates for being shared first, and then develop these as SOA services, reuse levels will definitely improve.

So, when getting started with SOA, don’t encourage everyone to start building code into services and hope that reuse will come as if by magic. Start off by deciding on the logical services to build that will be shared – things like get customer history, or create new customer. Then go ahead and build these shared services candidates, and see reuse levels climb….hopefully making it easier to justify your SOA investments to the business.

Steve

Posted in best practices, enterprise architecture, Imported, productivity, Reuse, SOA, SOA development.

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